Tag Archives: internment

Survey confirms majority want inclusiveness in Canadian human rights museum

For immediate release (Ottawa) – 23 March 2011

According to a recent national NANOS survey Canadians overwhelmingly want the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) to cover all episodes of genocide inclusively.

More than 60 per cent of Canadians wanted the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, a federally funded institution now under construction in Winnipeg, to be inclusive of all groups in Canada, not one or two privieleged ones, according to a recent NANOS poll.

Asked whether they preferred a thematic gallery dealing with genocide or wanted a particular example of genocide to be permanently highlighted in its own gallery, a majority of just over 60 per cent of Canadians opted for the former, preferring a thematic genocide gallery that treats all such crimes against humanity in an inclusive manner.

“A majority of voters from all age groups, of both genders, in every province and region, and representing every major Canadian political party, agreed with our view that no community’s suffering should be elevated above all others in a national museum funded by all Canadian taxpayers,” said Mr. R.W. Zakaluzny, chairman of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association (UCCLA). “Preferential, prominent and permanent recognition for one or two groups in a national museum funded from the public purse is unacceptable to Canadians. It’s time for the CMHR’s board of trustees to take note – the people of Canada don’t want their tax dollars funding partiality.”

“On the eve of a possible federal election we call on the Government of Canada, and in particular on the Honourable James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage, to replace members of the CMHR’s existing board of trustees with citizens more representative of Canadian society and to have the proposed contents of the CMHR carefully reconsidered with a view to ensuring that all 12 of its 12 galleries are thematic, comparative and inclusive. That’s what Canadians want.”

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NANOS random telephone survey of 1,216 Canadians conducted from 12 March to 15 March 2011. An aggregate total of 60.3% wanted “one exhibit which covers all genocides equally.” The margin of accuracy for a sample of 1,216 Canadians is plus/minus 2.8%, 19 times out of 20. “Our next question is about the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, a national museum funded by Canadian taxpayers. Would you prefer that there be one gallery that covers all genocides equally or that there be one gallery that highlights a particular genocide permanently while all the others are grouped together in a separate exhibit?” An aggregate of 15.3% were unsure while 24.4% wanted one gallery that highlighted a particular genocide.

For more information please visit www.uccla.ca  or www.twitter.com/uccla

For an interview contact Dr. Lubomyr Luciuk, UCCLA’s director of research, luciuk@uccla.ca

    Total One exhibit which covers all genocides equally One gallery that highlights a particular genocide permanently, while the others are grouped together in a separate exhibit Unsure
    Responses Percentage Percentage Percentage
Aggregate Canada, March 2011 1,216 60.3 24.4 15.3
Region Atlantic 121 62.3 23.5 14.2
  Quebec 301 70.2 16.9 12.9
  Ontario 369 60.9 25.3 13.8
  Prairies 243 51.4 27.0 21.6
  British Columbia 182 53.4 31.9 14.7
Gender Male 600 59.3 26.9 13.8
  Female 616 61.3 21.9 16.8
Age 18-29 250 65.6 24.7 9.7
  30-39 205 63.5 26.0 10.5
  40-49 254 58.5 24.6 16.9
  50-59 217 60.0 23.5 16.5
  60-plus 291 55.4 23.4 21.2
Vote Profile Liberal Party 262 57.3 26.8 15.9
  Conservative Party 366 56.8 28.6 14.6
  NDP 190 57.9 30.8 11.3
  Bloc Québécois 96 73.6 14.3 12.1
  Green Party 36 67.0 19.9 13.0
  undecided 267 64.1 15.9 20.0

Random telephone survey of 1.216 Canadians from March 12th to March 15th, 2011. The margin of accuracy for a sample of 1,216 Canadians is +/- 2.8%, 19 times out of 20. www.nanosresearch.com

Politicians & groups that support substantial change to current makeup and design of CMHR

Politicians & groups that support substantial change to current makeup and design of CMHR

Over the past few weeks and months, a number of prominent Canadians have come forward to note their objection on the record to the current iteration of the Canadian Museum of Human Rights being built in Winnipeg.

Noting that it is a federal institution funded entirely by taxpayers, on par with other national museums like the Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Que., and the War Museum in Ottawa, the growing list of politicians, experts and stakeholders below have noticed the inherent unfairness of a museum supposedly dedicated to the human rights of all Canadians favouring the story of just one or two groups.

This list continues to grow and updates will be made as more people go on the record.

 – Dec. 23, 2010: Elizabeth May and the Green Party of Canada:

"… we need to document the history of all Canadians and show how their experiences have shaped and will continue to shape our values of equality, dignity and inclusiveness. Genocide, no matter where or under what pretense it happens, is unacceptable to Canadians. The Green Party of Canada notes the genocide of between 7 and 10 million people in the (sic) Soviet Ukraine during 1932-1933 as an example that needs to be interpreted at the museum. Also, the history of internments during the two world wars should be better recognized by Canadians."

 – Jan. 20, 2011: Paul Dewar, MP (NDP, Ottawa Centre), NDP Foreign Affairs Critic, in a latter addressed to Hon. James Moore, Minister for Canadian Heritage and Official Languages:

“Dear Mr. Moore, (UCCLA Chair R.W. Zakaluzny) points out that there will be two galleries in the museum devoted to the suffering of aboriginal peoples and of the Jewish people. All other crimes against humanity will (be) grouped in a third single gallery. He requests that other atrocities that have profoundly affected Canadians be accorded equal treatment in the museum.

Mr. Zakaluzny raises an important and troubling point. I would appreciate it if you would address his concerns directly. I too am concerned that all atrocities be well addressed by the Human Rights Museum.”



 – Feb. 2, 2011:
James Bezan, MP (Conservative, Selkirk-Interlake):

" I believe that: The Holodomor genocide should have a unique, autonomous and prominent place in the CMHR; the CMHR Board of Directors contain respected members of the Ukrainian community with knowledge of the Holodomor and other human rights violations."

 –  Feb. 8, 2011:
Leon Benoit, MP (Conservative, Vegreville-Wainwright): 

"Benoit has heard from constituents about their specific worries  – that the Holodomor will be lumped into a general section of ‘Mass Atrocities’ which does not provide autonomy and permanent recognition of the event in the museum. They are also worried that other elements of their history will not receive ample recognition and be subsumed under other permanent exhibits promoted by the Content Advisory Committee Report. ‘I think the Advisory Committee is to be thanked for their report, but it is also important to remember that it is just a report,’ states Benoit. ‘It isn’t the final decision and it isn’t government policy.’
‘I certainly believe that the Holodomor genocide should have a unique, autonomous and prominent place in the CMHR,” affirms Benoit.  “I also think it is quite important that the CMHR Board of Directors contain respected members of the Ukrainian community with knowledge of the Holodomor and other human rights violations. I’m proud of our Government’s support for the CMHR. I hope the Museum’s Board of Trustees finds the courage to provide the Holodomor with the appropriate and respectful recognition it deserves.”


 – Feb. 8, 2011: Devinder Shory, MP (Calgary Northeast) issued this statement (excerpts below):

"…Our Canadian government was one of the first around teh world to recognize the Holodomor genocide as just that: genocide . . . I would like to add my voice in support of the Ukrainian community to recognize the Holodomor with a unique and appropriate place within the CMHR"

 – ~Feb 13, 2011: The Latvian, Lithuanian, Estonian, Hungarian, and Slovakian communities of Canada: In the Globe and Mail, called for an embargo on any further or incremental funding” until there’s an independent review of the museum’s contents and a new board created. “We are dismayed that the hard lessons learned by our communities … are callously ignored at present,” said CECC chair Markus Hess.

  – ~Feb. 13, 2011: Polish Canadian Congress, in the Globe and Mail: The CMHR in its current form is an inequitable display of what has happened in the world that has gone against human rights.”

Having “a separate, permanent room that says ‘the Holocaust’ leaves you questioning what the value is of all the other people who died otherwise . . . Without minimizing the Holocaust, we just feel that whole idea of ‘mass atrocities’ has to be rethought and perhaps have a larger display area in which the Holocaust, the Holodomor, the Armenian genocide, those things, [are] part and parcel of that,” said CPC president Teresa Berezowski.

 – Feb. 17, 2011: Tim Uppal, MP (Conservative, Edmonton-Sherwood Park):

"Recently I have heard from many representatives of the Ukrainian-Canadian community with their concerns regarding the Canadian Museum of Human Rights.  Specifically, many are worried that the Holodomor genocide and the Canadian internment of Ukrainians of World War I will not be given proper recognition, and will be included in a general section of ‘Mass Atrocities.’

"I support the following statement made by my colleague, James Bezan, Member of Parliament for Selkirk-Interlake: ‘I believe that the Holodomor genocide should have a unique, autonomous and prominent place in the CMHR, and that the CMHR Board of Directors contain respected members of the Ukrainian community with knowledge of the Holodomor and other human rights violations.’ "

 – Feb. 24, 2011: Statement of Liberal Members of Parliament on the Canadian Museum for Human Rights:

Borys Wrzesnewskyj, MP (Etobicoke Centre)

Gerard Kennedy, MP (Parkdale-High Park)

Kevin Lamoureux, MP (Winnipeg North)

 

Hon. Navdeep Bains, P.C., MP (Mississauga-Brampton South)

Bonnie Crombie, MP (Mississauga-Streetsville)

 

“The Canadian Museum for Human Rights presents an opportunity to illustrate the promise and the importance of human rights, but sadly part of its mission will necessarily also be to educate Canadians about the consequences of denying those rights.  The Holodomor is as graphic and moving an illustration as can be imagined of the denial of the basic Human Right to Food.”

“We federal Liberal Party Members of Parliament hold that this publicly funded national Canadian museum should create and operate a permanent gallery dedicated to the Holodomor, and that the Board of Directors of the CMHR should embrace and include respected members of the Ukrainian Canadian community with expertise in the Holodomor.

“It was the Jewish-Polish scholar Raphael Lemkin, known as the ‘Father of The Genocide Convention’ who coined the term ‘genocide’ when referring also to the Holodomor in his 1944 book Axis Rule in Occupied Europe. Unfortunately, the full extent of this horrific “genocide by famine” of millions of Ukrainians was suppressed behind the Iron Curtain during the subsequent 58 years by the Kremlin’s communist regime.

“By taking a leadership role in establishing a permanent gallery for the Holodomor, Canada would encourage post-communist countries that are now our economic and security partners to begin to more critically address the human rights violations and genocidal crimes perpetrated in the name of communism and to cease the Holodomor denials which continue to this day.

“By having the Holodomor in a permanent zone (exhibit) in our national human rights museum, Canada would fulfill its traditional role in leading the world in the promotion of human rights.”

– Feb. 24, 2011: Joy Smith, MP (Conservative, Kildonan-St. Paul): "I believe the Holodomor genocide should be given a prominent presentation that is independent of the Mass Atrocity gallery. Providing a unique and prominent exhibit for the Holodomor will rightly expose the violations of human rights and restore the dignity of victims through the acknowledgement of their suffering. Visitors to the museum will learn of the brutal human rights abuses of the Holodomor genocide and this will enlighten them to strive for human rights for all people.

"The Holocaust and the Holodomor were both black spots of history of humanity. Having both stories as prominent displays is imperative. Nations must learn so these tragedies will never happen again.  

"I also believe the Ukrainian community should have a representative voice on the Board of Directors for the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Canada boasts the third largest Ukrainian population in the world and our Parliament has officially recognized the Holodomor as a genocide. Thus it is appropriate that strong Ukrainian representation be present when planning a national museum about Human Rights."

 – Feb. 28, 2011, 2011: The Canada
Ukraine Parliamentary Friendship Group, from chair Mark Warawa, MP, moved the following motion "That the Canada-Ukraine Parliamentary Friendship Group endorse that a prominent exhibit of the Holodomor Genocide be part of the Canadian Museum of (sic) Human Rights; an exhibit which would fully tell the story of this genocide and that a Board of Directors include representations submitted by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress."

 – March 1, 2011: Laurie Hawn MP (Conservative, Edmonton Centre), issued this statement (excerpt below):

"Our government has made a positive investment in preserving Canada’s history through the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) in Winnipeg, MB. It is important that this investment results in a museum which has value for all Canadians . . . The main concern that has been expressed to me is that the Holodomor will be grouped into a general section of ‘Mass Atrocities’ and will not be provided its own independent, permanent and distinct zone, similar to the Holocaust and Aboriginal zones . . . I must recommend that the Holodomor genocide receive a unique and permanent place in the CMHR which will adequately reflect its impact on the Canadian Ukrainian community, its relationship with Canada and our understanding of human rights and genocide around the world."

 – March 3, 2011, an additional 10 sitting Liberal MPs (below in alphabetical order) agree to support this statement spearheaded by MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Hon. Wayne Easter, P.C., M.P. (Malpeque)
Hon. Hedy Fry, P.C., M.P. (Vancouver Centre)
Andrew Kania, M.P. (Brampton West)
Hon. Jim Karygiannis, P.C., M.P. (Scarborough-Agincourt)
Hon. Keith Martin, P.C., M.P. (Esquimalt-Juan de Fuca)
Massimo Pacetti, M.P. (Saint-Léonard-Saint-Michel)
Hon. Bob Rae, P.C., M.P. (Toronto Centre)
Scott Simms, M.P. (Bonavista-Gander-Grand Falls-Windsor)
Alan Tonks, M.P. (York South-Weston)
Frank Valeriote, M.P. (Guelph)

  – March 9, 2011, an additional 15 sitting Liberal MPs (below in alphabetical order) agree to support this statement spearheaded by MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

John Cannis, M.P. (Scarborough Centre)

Hon. Denis Coderre, P.C., M.P. (Bourassa)

Sukh Dhaliwal, M.P. (Newton-North Delta)

Marc Garneau, M.P. (Westmount-Ville-Marie)

Mark Holland, M.P. (Ajax-Pickering)

Hon. Maria Minna, P.C., M.P. (Beaches-East York)

Brian Murphy, M.P. (Moncton-Riverview-Dieppe)

Hon. Shawn Murphy, P.C., M.P. (Charlottetown)

Joyce Murray, M.P. (Vancouver Quadra)

Bernard Patry, M.P. (Pierrefonds-Dollard)

Todd Russell, M.P. (Labrador)

Mario Silva, M.P. (Davenport)

Michelle Simson, M.P. (Scarborough Southwest)

Hon. Judy Sgro, P.C., M.P. (York West)

Lise Zarac, M.P. (LaSalle-Émard)


 – March 12, 2011, Peter Goldring MP, Conservative, issued this statement (pdf file). Excerpt below:

"When the CMHR was first planned, Ukrainian Canadians were led to believe there would be a permanent exhibit about the Holodomor a horrific time which saw some eight million people die. But apparently plans changed and now there will only be two human rights tragedies with their own permanent display.

"Certainly we should not be somehow ranking examples of man’s inhumanity to man. The issue is not eight million dead Jews and others in the Holocaust of World War II, as many as eight million during the Holodomor or the 1.5 million dead in the “killing fields” of Pol Pot’s Cambodia or the million killed in the Rwandan genocide.

"The Holodomor was a genocide on the size, scale and relative duration of the Holocaust. It does make sense that this atrocity that impacted so many Canadians (1.2 million of whom are of Ukrainian ancestry, my wife included) be on permanent display at the CMHR – particularly due to the lack of knowledge of this genocide, even by politicians."

  – March 25, 2011, an additional 10 sitting Liberal MPs (below in alphabetical order) agree to support this statement spearheaded by MP Borys Wrzesnewskyj:

Scott Andrews, M.P. (Avalon)

Hon. Ujjal Dosanjh, P.C., M.P. (Vancouver South)

Kirsty Duncan, M.P. (Etobicoke North)

Hon. Lawrence MacAulay, P.C., M.P. (Cardigan)

Alexandra Mendes, M.P. (Brossard-La Prairie)

Glen Pearson, M.P. (London North Centre)

Marcel Proulx, M.P. (Hull-Aylmer)

Yasmin Ratansi, M.P. (Don Valley East)

Pablo Rodriguez, M.P. (Honoré-Mercier)

Paul Szabo, M.P. (Mississauga South)

 

UCCLA calls for review of Museum for Human Rights’ funding, management

UCCLA Media Release (Ottawa – 17 January 2011)

Call for a review of Museum for Human Rights’ funding and management

Recent comments by officials from the Canadian Museum for Human Rights have made it clear that the proposed contents of this taxpayer-funded national museum will neither be fair nor equitable.

To clarify matters, and speaking to points made by CMHR representatives, Roman Zakaluzny, UCCLA’s chair, said:

"The museum’s CEO, Stuart Murray, has now admitted that the suffering of Jews during the Shoah and of indigenous peoples in Canada will have permanent and prominent gallery spaces (zones) assigned to them, a point underscored in Ottawa recently by Patrick O’Reilly, the Museum’s Chief Operating Officer. All other genocides and crimes against humanity- ‘a hundred’ or so according to museum researchers – will be lumped into a ‘Mass Atrocities’ zone. In our view this is unjust, ahistorical, and certainly unacceptable given that this is a taxpayer-funded national museum.

"In addition, museum officials are also largely ignoring what their own surveys have told them the public expected to see in this museum.  (page 63 of PDF, page 35 of document)

"Every one of the twelve zones (galleries) in this museum should be thematic, comparative and inclusive. For example, there should be a gallery dealing with Canadian internment operations and the War Measures Act, which had a negative impact on Ukrainians and other Europeans during the First World War, and on Japanese, German and Italian Canadians during the Second World War, and on French Canadians in 1970. Similarly, a Genocide Gallery would include the Shoah alongside the Armenian Genocide, the Holodomor, the Rwandan Genocide, the Maoist Terror and others. That’s fair and equitable. What logical or moral argument can there be for calling what happened to the Armenians or the Chinese or the Cambodians or the Ukrainians as a ‘mass atrocity’ while insisting that only the Holocaust was an act of genocide or somehow worthy of a privileged space?

"No Ukrainian Canadian organization has ever said that the aboriginal experience in Canada or that the Shoah in Europe should not be included in this museum. Both must be. That said, those stories must not be given privileged space in a museum that all Canadians are being called upon to pay for, in perpetuity.

"Since it is now apparent that those in charge of this project are intent on pursuing their own vision of what should be included, irrespective of legitimate concerns and of their own surveys (page 63 of PDF, page 35 of document) of the public, and that they are still attempting to confuse the public about their prearrangements and plans, we call upon the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Honourable James Moore, to order an immediate stop to any further federal financial support for this museum and to initiate a complete overhaul of its board of trustees and management. A national museum should serve some important national interest. As currently envisioned, this museum will only be a continuing source of divisiveness and controversy."

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For more information or an interview, please contact luciuk (at) uccla.ca
www.uccla.ca
www.twitter.com/uccla

Response to Misconceptions about Canadian Museum of Human Rights

UCCLA Media Release (Ottawa – 7 January 2011)

Response to Misconceptions about Canadian Museum of Human Rights

Commenting on yesterday’s (6 January) media advisory from the Canadian Museum of Human Rights, the chair of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association, Mr. Roman Zakaluzny, said:

"We are not aware of any misconceptions about the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. It is a publicly funded, national museum whose operating budget will be supported, in perpetuity, by all Canadian taxpayers. At present the Museum’s plans call for 12 galleries, known as zones. Ten of these will apparently be thematic, but two are already fixed in terms of their focus – on Jewish suffering during the Second World War (the Shoah) and Canadian aboriginal issues. By being afforded permanent and prominent spaces in this museum, the horrors endured by these groups are being elevated above those of all other peoples.

"Furthermore, while the contents of most galleries may not yet be settled, the Museum’s spokesperson, Ms. Angela Cassie, admits that privileged gallery spaces have been prearranged for two communities. We, and the Canadian public in general, oppose this preferential treatment.

"The Ukrainian Canadian community has raised publicly its concerns with respect to the management, governance and proposed contents of this publicly funded Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Those legitimate concerns were not answered by the Museum’s Jan. 6 communique. Until such a time as they are, we again call upon the Government of Canada to –

1. suspend any further financial support for this project
2. establish an independent group to review the proposed contents of this national museum
3. appoint new members to its board of directors who are more representative of Canadian society

"Welcome as the prospect of a Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg is, we cannot accept the public purse being used to fund partiality or prejudice."

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For more on UCCLA, go to:
 
www:uccla.ca

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UCCLA commemorates Montreal internment site, lays down 2011 plans

UKRAINIAN GROUP COMMEMORATES MONTREAL INTERNMENT SITE

For immediate release (Montreal, Ottawa)
4 October 2010

On the 40th anniversary of The War Measures Act being deployed during the "Quebec Crisis," the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association (UCCLA) held a brief but poignant memorial service at City Hall in Montreal, near a site where almost a 100 years earlier the War Measures Act was first used during Canada’s first national internment operations of 1914-20. In September 1914 Montreal’s federal Immigration Building served as a receiving station, processing dozens of Ukrainians and other Europeans branded as “enemy aliens.” To this day no plaque nor memorial recalls that unhappy moment in Quebec and Canadian history.



Members of the UCCLA are planning a memorial at or near this site at Montreal’s City Hall to commemorate an internment receiving station that existed nearby during the First World War.

“Three times the Government of Canada has made use of martial law in this country,” said Roman Zakaluzny, newly elected chair of the UCCLA. “We purposely picked Quebec as the site of this year’s annual conclave in order to recall Canada’s first national internment operations and to remind all Canadians that civil liberties and personal freedoms should never be taken for granted.”

With the assistance of Father Ihor Oshchipko, UCCLA and its supporters held a brief prayer service near Montreal’s City Hall not far from where the Immigration Building once stood on rue Saint-Antoine. The UCCLA hopes to work in conjunction with the City and other stakeholders to ensure that a trilingual memorial plaque is erected on City property before 2012. Twenty-one other internment camp sites across the country have already been so distinguished.

In addition, the UCCLA during its Oct. 1-3 conclave extended its support for the 10 December 2010 opening of an interpretive centre at La Ferme, Que., (formerly known as Spirit Lake). That was the site of one of the largest WWI concentration camps, housing men as well as women and children sent far north into the Abitibi region and there forced to do heavy labour for the profit of their jailers. Supported by UCCLA, the Spirit Lake Camp Corporation has spearheaded fundraising for this new centre and has secured major funding from the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.

As well, the UCCLA:

– will move ahead with plans to secure a proper Christian burial for the remains of two internees, Messrs Bahriy and Konyk, in a Ukrainian Catholic cemetery in southwestern Ontario;

– intends to play an active role in a content advisory capacity as Parks Canada works toward the development of a major internment museum at Cave and Basin in Banff National Park;

– will help collect archival materials having to do with the Ukrainian Canadian redress campaign, working to help ensure that they are then deposited in the Queen’s University Archives and made available to researchers;

– will actively work to ensure that Conservative MP, Tim Uppal’s Bill C-442, “An Act to establish a National Holocaust Monument (National Holocaust Monument Act),” will be inclusive and include references to all victims of the Holocaust, regardless of ethnicity or faith;

– approved funding for the production of a professional informational commercial to combat Ukrainophobia in the Greater Toronto Area;

– initiated a national postcard campaign aimed at convincing the Conservative Government of the Right Honorable Stephen Harper to enforce Canadian immigration laws by acting to remove all veterans of the Soviet secret police, the NKVD/KGB, from Canada; and,

– selected Saskatoon as the site for its next annual conclave, to be held in October 2011.

Concurrently meeting in Montreal, the executive of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation, an educational and charitable group, (http://www.ucclf.ca and #ucclf) briefed UCCLA delegates about their scholarship programs and donation toward the construction of the Maple Leaf / Klenovi Lyst Safe House in Ukraine providing sanctuary for orphans, children at risk and women escaping the evils of trafficking.
– 30 –

For more information or an interview, please contact Roman Zakaluzny, chairman the UCCLA, at rwzakalu@gmail.com.

Please follow the UCCLA on twitter at www.twitter.com/uccla or visit http://www.uccla.ca.

Hear about the UCCLA’s conclave on Ukrainian Time radio in Montreal:

Ukrainian Time Oct. 2, 2010 show. The portion on the UCCLA begins at the 23:47 mark, in Ukrainian. The first English-language portion begins at 25:09, then again at 31:50.