Category Archives: Educational

Third Annual Student Writing Competitions launched

For Immediate Release (Edmonton, July 3, 2010)

The Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation (UCCLF) Tuesday launched its third annual student writing competition.

“The Foundation has already doled out $2,000 since 2008, the inaugural year of the competitions which marked the 75th anniversary of Ukraine’s Famine-Genocide – the Holodomor. We are once again encouraging students to actively engage in and do research on a civil liberties theme and to commemorate victims of genocide,” said Andriy Harasymiw, Scholarships Director for the Foundation.

Two separate awards are being offered. Valued at $500, the High School Civil Liberties Award will go to a Canadian student aged 13-18 who submits a research essay of up to 1,500 words based on a Holodomor theme. The winning essay will be determined by a selection committee derived from the Ukrainian Canadian community. Judging will be based solely on the quality of essay content. Submission deadline has been set at Oct. 29, 2010.

The Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award will go to a high school or post-secondary student whose Holodomor-based opinion-editorial appears in print in a major Canadian newspaper prior to the Nov. 30, 2010 deadline. The value of this award has been set at $1,000. However, this amount is subject to change in the event that an op-ed from more than one student appears in a major Canadian newspaper.

“We’re very pleased with the quality of applications we have received through the first two years of the competitions,” continued Harasymiw. “The Foundation looks forward to receiving many high-quality submissions in the upcoming months.”

Last year, Adrian Warchola of Edmonton was awarded $500 by the Foundation in winning the High School Civil Liberties prize with his essay entitled Extermination of the Breadbasket of Europe. In 2008, Antin Stowell of Winnipeg won the High School Civil Liberties prize and was likewise awarded $500. Also in 2008, the Foundation awarded Christina Dykun of Toronto $1,000 for having her Holodomor opinion-editorial published in the Calgary Sun.

More detailed information along with application forms can be obtained by e-mailing the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation at info@UCCLF.ca

UCCLF’s High School Civil Liberties Award recipient announced

For Immediate Release (Edmonton and Ottawa, 18 January 2010)

The Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation (UCCLF) is pleased to announce Adrian Warchola, a Grade 12 student from Edmonton, as the recipient of this year’s annual UCCLF High School Civil Liberties Award.

The 2009 award  – the second annual – is given to a high school student who submitted the highest-quality research essay based on a Holodomor theme, an initiative undertaken bu the UCCLF in recognition of the 75th anniversary of Ukraine’s Famine Genocide.

Adrian’s essay was among numerous submissions which were adjudicated by the award selection committee, which included Prof. Ludmilla Voitkovska of the languages and linguistics department at the University of Saskatchewan. Adrian’s essay is deemed to have been superior in research, organization and presentation.

The UCCLF would like to congratulate Adrian and all the students who submitted an essay.  As the winner of the competition, Adrian was awarded $500 along with a copy of Holodomor: Reflections on the Great Famine of 1932-1933 in Soviet Ukraine, edited by Lubomyr Luciuk. Other participants in this writing competition will be awarded a copy of Into Auschwitz, For Ukraine by Stefan Petelycky for their efforts.

The UCCLF would also like to take the opportunity to inform high school and post-secondary students of its annual Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award.  Valued at $1,000, this award is given to a student whose Holodomor-based opinion editorial appears in a major Canadian newspaper according to the rules as prescribed each year by the UCCLF.

Read Adrian’s Essay

Included is a photograph of Mr. Adrian Warchola. For more information on either award, to contact Adrian Warchola for an interview, or to receive a copy of his winning essay, please contact the UCCLF at:  info@UCCLF.ca

Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award Recipient Announced

For Immediate Release (Calgary, 21 January 2009)

The Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Foundation (UCCLF) is pleased to announce Christina Dykun, 21, of Toronto, Ontario as the recipient of this year’s inaugural Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award.

This award was to be given to a high school or post-secondary student who had an opinion-editorial on a Holodomor theme published in a major Canadian newspaper, an initiative undertaken in recognition of the 75th anniversary of Ukraine’s Famine Genocide.

Christina’s submission, titled “Nation still hungers for the truth”, appeared in the November 23rd edition of the Calgary Sun.

As the winner of the competition, Christina will be awarded $1,000.00 as well as a copy of Into Auschwitz, For Ukraine by Stefan Petelycky for her efforts.

Christina is in her fourth year at the University of Toronto, graduating in the spring with an honours B.A. in English and History. Her future aspirations are within the field of Law. Her active involvement in the Plast organization stems from early childhood, and is currently a ‘podruha’ at the Plast Toronto Branch. Having graduated from ‘Ridna Skola’ in Chicago, she continues her study of Ukrainian linguistics and history at the university level. Christina is very involved within the university Ukrainian life, as she has been a member of the Ukrainian Students Club at the University of Toronto as well as a member, past president and vice-president of the student council at St. Vladimir’s Institute in Toronto.

Her involvement in extracurricular activities is quite varied. She has played on the Varsity Team at the University of Toronto all four years, helping her team secure a first-place OUA finish 3 years in a row. This year, Christina was elected captain, and continues her involvement in Varsity Athletics as a representative on the Varsity Board. Other interests include music, where she has played the piano competitively for 14 years, and today enjoys playing as a relaxing pastime. Her lifelong enjoyment of reading and writing are furthered by her chosen curriculum.

The UCCLF would like to congratulate Christina for writing an excellent opinion-editorial and having it published.

Read Christina’s Article

For more information, please contact UCCLF at their email address: info@UCCLF.ca

Internment Historical Marker Program

Efforts to preserve and enhance cultural assets can provide important economic benefits and opportunities for greater social cohesion, reinforcing a common identity and strengthening socio-economic aspirations.  By treating our cultural heritage as a capital asset and preserving it via the Internment Historical Marker Program throughout Canada, Canadians can then hold that heritage in trust for future generations. The plaques that have been placed at the internment camp sites across the country serve to mark the spot, make a claim on the history of that part of Canada, remember the victims of the camps, and share the history with tourists and passers-by.

Prior to UCCLF obtaining formal charitable status, its members have worked with the communities in which internment camps operated throughout Canada to install commemorative plaques and statues.  These plaques identify the camp and their prisoners and are located at 20 of the 24 camp sites throughout Canada.

Installation of the existing 20 plaques has taken approximately 20 years to accomplish with countless voluntary hours of UCCLF members working with individuals from each community, including municipal and town officials to secure permission from landowners, historical society members to ensure accurate placement of the markers, and generous individuals who have donated the materials for the plaques.

UCCLF members have also worked with Parks Canada to have the trilingual interpretive panels installed at the Cave and Basin site near Banff, Alberta.

Outstanding camp sites include: Eaton, Saskatchewan; Lethbridge, Alberta; Montreal, Quebec; and Halifax, Nova Scotia.

UCCLF is striving to ensure the final plaques are installed in 2014, prior to the 100th anniversary of the opening of the first camp.  If you would like to help us accomplish this goal, please Donate Now or Volunteer.

View our Interactive Map of Internment Camps here.

Student Scholarship Program

Student Scholarship Program

The UCCLF scholarship program was established in 2008 to mark the 75th anniversary of one of the 20th century’s greatest violations of civil liberties – the Holodomor, the Great Famine throughout Soviet Ukraine.  The scholarship program assists students with their educational pursuits by providing them with financial assistance and by helping them to fulfill their educational requirements.

Encouraging students to research and write about such atrocities will increase the amount of research and information available about the Holodomor and other civil liberties atrocities.

In 2008, UCCLF launched the annual High School Civil Liberties Award and the Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award.


The Foundation provides the following two scholarships to support high school and undergraduate/graduate students undertaking short essays or course work related to civil liberties themes.High School Civil Liberties Award: Valued at $500, the award will go to a high school student aged 13-18 who submits a research essay of up to 1,500 words based on a civil liberties theme.

Civil Liberties Opinion-Editorial Award: Valued at $1000, the award will go to a high school or post-secondary student whose civil liberties-based opinion-editorial appears in a major Canadian newspaper prior to deadline. The amount of this award is subject to change in the event that an op-ed from more than one student appears in a major Canadian newspaper.

All students must submit the application form that outlines eligibility requirements. An award selection committee, comprising Foundation members and academic volunteers review and adjudicate the submitted scholarship applications to determine to whom the awards should be given.