Ukrainian Canadian community welcomes Royal assent for Holocaust Monument Bill

26 March 2011


For immediate release (Ottawa)

OTTAWA— The chairman of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association (UCCLA), Mr. R.W. Zakaluzny, expressed his thanks today to Mr. Tim Uppal, MP, whose private member’s bill in the House of Commons has now received Royal Assent. Bill C 442, An Act to Establish a National Holocaust Monument, will commemorate all of the victims of Nazi Germany, including the many millions of Ukrainians enslaved or murdered by the Nazis and the Ukrainian survivors of the Holocaust who made Canada their home.

"Canada welcomed tens of thousands of Ukrainians, Poles, Russians, Jews and others who were persecuted by the Nazis, who lost family members and friends during the Second World War, who saw their homelands devastated by both the Soviet and Nazi regimes, as so thoughtfully underscored in Professor Timothy Snyder’s book, Bloodlands," said Mr. Zakaluzny. "Mr. Uppal is to be congratulated for crafting a bill that will ensure that all of the victims of Nazi Germany are remembered, a perspective too often lost when the focus is only on one or another community’s suffering. We would also like to congratulate the Canadian Jewish Congress for its determination in moving this legislation forward. We know how hard it can be to get a private member’s bill to the stage where it receives Royal Assent.

"And, of course, we will support a Canadian national monument that, as the CJC’s Bernie Farber affirmed, ‘will pay homage to the thousands of Holocaust survivors who made Canada their adopted home after the Second World War and contributed in remarkable ways to all aspects of Canadian society [and] honour those who perished, Jews and non-Jews alike.’ A genuinely inclusive commemorative project of this sort  is one that we will support."

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For more information, please visit www.uccla.ca or www.twitter.com/uccla

Survey confirms majority want inclusiveness in Canadian human rights museum

For immediate release (Ottawa) – 23 March 2011

According to a recent national NANOS survey Canadians overwhelmingly want the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) to cover all episodes of genocide inclusively.

More than 60 per cent of Canadians wanted the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, a federally funded institution now under construction in Winnipeg, to be inclusive of all groups in Canada, not one or two privieleged ones, according to a recent NANOS poll.

Asked whether they preferred a thematic gallery dealing with genocide or wanted a particular example of genocide to be permanently highlighted in its own gallery, a majority of just over 60 per cent of Canadians opted for the former, preferring a thematic genocide gallery that treats all such crimes against humanity in an inclusive manner.

“A majority of voters from all age groups, of both genders, in every province and region, and representing every major Canadian political party, agreed with our view that no community’s suffering should be elevated above all others in a national museum funded by all Canadian taxpayers,” said Mr. R.W. Zakaluzny, chairman of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association (UCCLA). “Preferential, prominent and permanent recognition for one or two groups in a national museum funded from the public purse is unacceptable to Canadians. It’s time for the CMHR’s board of trustees to take note – the people of Canada don’t want their tax dollars funding partiality.”

“On the eve of a possible federal election we call on the Government of Canada, and in particular on the Honourable James Moore, Minister of Canadian Heritage, to replace members of the CMHR’s existing board of trustees with citizens more representative of Canadian society and to have the proposed contents of the CMHR carefully reconsidered with a view to ensuring that all 12 of its 12 galleries are thematic, comparative and inclusive. That’s what Canadians want.”

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NANOS random telephone survey of 1,216 Canadians conducted from 12 March to 15 March 2011. An aggregate total of 60.3% wanted “one exhibit which covers all genocides equally.” The margin of accuracy for a sample of 1,216 Canadians is plus/minus 2.8%, 19 times out of 20. “Our next question is about the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, a national museum funded by Canadian taxpayers. Would you prefer that there be one gallery that covers all genocides equally or that there be one gallery that highlights a particular genocide permanently while all the others are grouped together in a separate exhibit?” An aggregate of 15.3% were unsure while 24.4% wanted one gallery that highlighted a particular genocide.

For more information please visit www.uccla.ca  or www.twitter.com/uccla

For an interview contact Dr. Lubomyr Luciuk, UCCLA’s director of research, luciuk@uccla.ca

    Total One exhibit which covers all genocides equally One gallery that highlights a particular genocide permanently, while the others are grouped together in a separate exhibit Unsure
    Responses Percentage Percentage Percentage
Aggregate Canada, March 2011 1,216 60.3 24.4 15.3
Region Atlantic 121 62.3 23.5 14.2
  Quebec 301 70.2 16.9 12.9
  Ontario 369 60.9 25.3 13.8
  Prairies 243 51.4 27.0 21.6
  British Columbia 182 53.4 31.9 14.7
Gender Male 600 59.3 26.9 13.8
  Female 616 61.3 21.9 16.8
Age 18-29 250 65.6 24.7 9.7
  30-39 205 63.5 26.0 10.5
  40-49 254 58.5 24.6 16.9
  50-59 217 60.0 23.5 16.5
  60-plus 291 55.4 23.4 21.2
Vote Profile Liberal Party 262 57.3 26.8 15.9
  Conservative Party 366 56.8 28.6 14.6
  NDP 190 57.9 30.8 11.3
  Bloc Québécois 96 73.6 14.3 12.1
  Green Party 36 67.0 19.9 13.0
  undecided 267 64.1 15.9 20.0

Random telephone survey of 1.216 Canadians from March 12th to March 15th, 2011. The margin of accuracy for a sample of 1,216 Canadians is +/- 2.8%, 19 times out of 20. www.nanosresearch.com